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Education in Ancient Egypt

 

Children in Ancient Egypt stayed with their mothers until the age of four. During these years, a strong respect for their mothers was instilled in the children. At the age of four, education of the boys was taken over by their fathers.

 

The trades in Ancient Egypt had levels of earnings and power associated with them. Sons typically followed in the same trade that their father practiced. Some children at this time attended a general village school while others attended a school designed for a specific career such as a priest or a scribe.

 

Schools taught writing, reading, math, and sports as well as morals and manors. At the age of fourteen, sons of farmers or craftsmen joined their dads in their professions. Those children whose parents had higher status careers continued their education at special schools usually attached to temples or governmental centers.

 

This higher level of education included learning what was called “Instruction of Wisdom.” The “Instruction of Wisdom” included lessons on ethics and morality. This higher level of education also focused on skills needed for higher status positions such as doctor or scribe. The educational track that a student followed was typically determined by the position that the father held in society, yet, students who showed ability were able to receive training for higher status jobs.

 

Very few careers were open to most women. While most women trained for motherhood and on how to be a good wife, some girls could train to be dancers, entertainers, weavers, or bakers. Only the daughters of wealthy nobles received an education in reading or writing. The majority of Egyptian women were trained at home by their own mothers.

 

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